Nouveau site !

A l’occasion de cette nouvelle année, le caviste est heureux de vous présenter son nouveau site Internet. Au programme, actualités, dégustations et présentation de nouveaux produits.

Regulation of the label gluten-free varies by country. Most countries derive key provisions of their gluten free labeling regulations from the Codex Alimentarius international standards for food labeling has a standard relating to the labeling of products as gluten-free. It only applies to foods that would normally contain gluten. Gluten free is defined as 20 ppm (= 20 mg/kg) or less. It categorizes gluten free food as: Food that is gluten free by composition; Food that has become gluten free through special processing. Reduced gluten content, food which includes food products with between 20 and 100 ppm of gluten. Reduced gluten content is left up to individual nations to more specifically define. The Codex Standard suggests the enzyme-linked Immunoassay (ELISA) R5 Mendez method for indicating the presence of gluten, but allows for other relevant methods, such as DNA. The Codex Standard specifies that the gluten free claim must appear in the immediate proximity of the name of the product, to ensure visibility. There is no general agreement on the analytical method used to measure gluten in ingredients and food products. The ELISA method was designed to detect w-gliadins, but it suffered from the setback that it lacked sensitivity for barley prolamins. The use of highly sensitive assays is mandatory to certify gluten-free food products. The European Union, World Health Organization, and Codex Alimentarius require reliable measurement of the wheat prolamins, gliadins rather than all-wheat proteins.